design Files
Title

Every Detail Counts

subject

CGI

introduction

Dmitry Mazurkevich is a CGI artist who does 3D visualization. Visualization is the process in which life-like images are created using 3D rendering software. Visualization in the automotive world is often used to place cars in otherworldly scenarios, or simply to bring them to life before they’ve been produced. To be a visualization artist requires a very high level of technical skill, along with a strong attention to detail. 

Dmitry is an incredibly talented self-taught visualization artist with a background in architecture. His work brings hyper-detail to beautifully reimagined cars that he envisions himself. For this interview, we focused on one of his recent projects the widebody BMW E24 635 CSI.

"Referring to my architectural background, ‘less is more’"

Dmitry Mazurkevich
interview

BP

Tell us a little bit about yourself and your background.

DM

My name is Dmitry Mazurkevich, I am a CGI artist located in Belarus. I started with a degree in architecture, I’ve been working in the 3D sphere for over 6 years already. As soon as I was certain in my technical and artistic skills, I devoted all the time to what I’m most passionate about - cars. That’s when I realized that a lot of real car projects/builds have a need for CGI visualization. When planning a car project it’s essential to have a clear vision of the look of the final build. That’s what photorealistic CGI can offer.

As a teenager, I spent a great amount of time taking apart cars and figuring out how the mechanisms work. My friends and I managed to build an electric tricycle. This was the project where I first applied my design skills and realized how much more should I learn.

BP

When did you begin to have an interest in CGI? What sparked that interest? 

DM

From the first year of university, we were taught to draw complex plans and blueprints by hand. It took large amounts of time and was a pretty monotonous way of spending time. In an attempt to optimize my workflow I discovered the world of CGI or computer-generated images.

BMW widebody Dmitry Mazurkevich design files automotive design
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Dmitry Mazurkevich
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Dmitry Mazurkevich
BMW CGI Render by Dmitry Mazurkevich
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Dmitry Mazurkevich

BP

How did you learn the skills that you have today? Did you go to school for them or teach yourself?

DM

All the knowledge I have today is from the web resources. First of all, you need to learn how to search for your issues of interest. Secondly, find thematic communities, review dozens of images and projects. It will form your awareness of what distinguishes good projects from the bad projects.

 

BP

When did your interest in cars begin? What are some of your favorite cars?

DM

My passion for cars started in my childhood. The first book I ever read was a car magazine dated 1997. Talking about favorite cars, I don’t have a specific answer. Like music genres, I do love and respect cars of different eras and countries. The “genres” that are closer to me are 90s JDM, 70-80s Italian design, and 90s NASCAR.


BP

You’ve got a pretty good eye for automotive body styling. As a CGI artist, what would you say are the basics of automotive styling? 

DM

From my point of view, it is essential that aftermarket body elements are in harmony with the original type of body, you need a sense of the design era when the car was produced. In other words, I find it inappropriate to put some DTM canards or JDM Enkei rims on a classic 70’s Alfa Romeo body.

BMW roll cage Dmitry Mazurkevich design files automotive design CGI
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Dmitry Mazurkevich


rotiform basics of automotive design CGI wheels Dmitry Mazurkevich
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Dmitry Mazurkevich
Basics of automotive design dmitry mazurkevich voltage
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Dmitry Mazurkevich

BP

What kinds of cars do you like?

DM

Speed is always the most important aspect for me. That’s the reason all types of grid, drift, and drag vehicles attract me more. 


BP

Let’s talk about the BMW e24, why did you pick this car? What made you interested in it?

DM

It was planned to be more about a creative statement than just installing a typical widebody kit on a classic car. To demonstrate a minimalistic approach. No needless details, but the function determines the shape.

That’s the way of modern rethinking a classic body while preserving its original charm. The exterior itself isn’t lost under numerous splitters and vents. Side window to side body panel proportion remains the same as in the 80s. No loss of original identity. Just a few modifications that improve aerodynamic specs and add some aggression. That’s all the “shark” needs. Referring to my architectural background, “less is more” (Mies Van Der Rohe).

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Dmitry Mazurkevich
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Dmitry Mazurkevich
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Dmitry Mazurkevich

BP

Take us through your process step by step with this car, you said you’ve got some examples of the work in progress?

DM

Although my approach is minimalistic, my working process and fanatical passion for detail in 3D is not. The whole car (except the tires) was modeled from scratch with the help of self-made blueprints. AutoCAD was used to prepare blueprints of each stock side view as well as widebody panels, splitters, and rims. That all was done to eliminate size imperfections. From the very first steps, I kept in mind the final configuration and the vibe of this build. Street/ track race car with subtle body panels that do not interrupt the original shape but let Pirelli P Zero Trofeo tires and Rotiform 917 fit in perfectly. The final level of detail can be seen on so-called “grid” images. That’s the result of modeling in 3ds Max. Every filament in each lamp was modeled in order to make physically correct light distortion in rendering.


You can notice from the images that there are actually two versions of the bodykit. The second version is for racing rather than street, and is supplied with extra vents, fender cutouts, and fuel filler caps instead of a number plate. Also, the rims were swapped to Rotiform LVS. That’s a postscript to the main version.


As soon as the model was compiled and textured (each part got its unique material), then it came time for the rendering process. It’s of vital importance to present the car in a matching surrounding. It takes a lot to produce one: numerous setting changes, previews, and adjustments. Volumetric fog simulation was used to make the final render set more atmospheric. It is not as simple as just putting some city landscape on the background. You should make sure the surrounding places emphasize the car. The project is about the emotions the car evokes. Shape, color, light, mood-setting of the final set of images. All at once asks the question: Do you wanna drive this car?

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Dmitry Mazurkevich
BMW widebody Dmitry Mazurkevich design files automotive design rear end
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Dmitry Mazurkevich
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Dmitry Mazurkevich

BP

For anyone who wants to get into CGI or automotive modeling like you do. What tools would you recommend they learn? 

DM

In today’s world, it makes no difference which software you choose to start modeling or rendering. Theory of topology (science about 3d modeling) or techniques of setting the light scheme is common and applicable to any up-to-date software.  


BP

What advice would you have to anyone who’s just starting out? 

DM

Level up your technical skills so they do not obstruct you in developing your artistic skills.

BMW widebody Dmitry Mazurkevich design files automotive design racing livery
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Dmitry Mazurkevich

"Level up your technical skills so they do not obstruct you in developing your artistic skills."

Dmitry Mazurkevich
conclusion

This interview is a part of a series exploring the basics of automotive design, and the people who are designing the future of human transportation. If you enjoyed this interview please consider signing up for my weekly newsletter.

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